magnet

On July 19, 2013, the Muon g-2 magnet ring was moving up the Illinois River on its five-week journey from Brookhaven National Laboratory (Long Island, New York) to Fermilab. Scientists will announce the first results from the Muon g-2 experiments at 10 a.m. CDT on April 7, 2021. Muon G-2, Brookhaven National Laboratory Photo: Reidar Hahn, Fermilab

On July 19, 2013, the Muon g-2 magnet ring was moving up the Illinois River on its way from Brookhaven National Laboratory to Fermilab. It arrived in Lemont, Illinois, on July 21, 2013. Scientists will announce the first results from the Muon g-2 experiment at 10 a.m. CDT on April 7, 2021.

A super-precise experiment at Fermilab is carefully analyzing every detail of the muon’s magnetic moment. The Fermilab Muon g-2 collaboration has announced it will present its first result at 10 a.m. CDT on April 7.

From Berkeley Lab, Feb. 17, 2021: Fermilab is part of a team of national labs that designed, built and fully tested a prototype magnet for today’s and tomorrow’s light sources. These light sources let scientists see things once thought impossible. They can use these visions to create more durable materials, build more efficient batteries and computers, and learn more about the natural world.

The U.S. Department of Energy has given the U.S. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider Accelerator Upgrade Project approval to move full-speed-ahead in building and delivering components for the HL-LHC, specifically, cutting-edge magnets and accelerator cavities that will enable more rapid-fire collisions at the collider. The collider upgrades will allow physicists to study particles such as the Higgs boson in greater detail and reveal rare new physics phenomena. The U.S. collaborators on the project may now move into production mode.

Later this decade, the Large Hadron Collider will be upgraded to the High-Luminosity LHC. What does “luminosity” mean in particle physics, and why measure it instead of collisions?