magnet

Wilson Hall behind text: 2021 at Fermilab

For Fermilab, 2021 was a momentous year that included major science results, construction progress, record-setting equipment, and more. Get a quick recap of some 2021 milestones in this video, which features drone and timelapse footage from around the lab.

From New Atlas, December 1, 2021: Neutrino research and other experiments may have new magnets to use in the future. Physicists at Fermilab have developed a superconducting magnet that can perform at high temperatures and higher field strength. Read more about the work of Vladimir Shiltsev and Alexander Zlobin.

Man standing, operating machine

Large, powerful magnets are a vital component of particle accelerators. The general rule is, the stronger the magnetic field, the better. For many particle accelerator applications, it is as important how fast a magnet can reach its peak strength and then ramp down again. A team at Fermilab now has achieved the world’s fastest ramping rates for accelerator magnets using high-temperature superconductors.

On July 19, 2013, the Muon g-2 magnet ring was moving up the Illinois River on its five-week journey from Brookhaven National Laboratory (Long Island, New York) to Fermilab. Scientists will announce the first results from the Muon g-2 experiments at 10 a.m. CDT on April 7, 2021. Muon G-2, Brookhaven National Laboratory Photo: Reidar Hahn, Fermilab

On July 19, 2013, the Muon g-2 magnet ring was moving up the Illinois River on its way from Brookhaven National Laboratory to Fermilab. It arrived in Lemont, Illinois, on July 21, 2013. Scientists will announce the first results from the Muon g-2 experiment at 10 a.m. CDT on April 7, 2021.