history

Dr. Kirsty Duffy talks about how we can see the invisible with detectors. She shares the bizarre story of the first neutrino detector: Project Poltergeist. Plus, MicroBooNE scientist Katrina Miller shows us the materials used to build modern detectors — and what scientists see when a neutrino finally says hello.

No aspect of Fermilab, past or present — the accomplishments of the Tevatron, the popular Arts and Lecture Series, the education efforts, the world-leading neutrino program — would be what it is today without the contributions of women. This International Women’s Day, we honor their contributions.

The newly modernized site offers something for everyone. It includes all the old content, reorganized into a more user-friendly format with additional content. Comb through the Fermilab History and Archives website to learn about Fermilab’s history, explore its digital collections or even enjoy an art exhibit.

Albert Einstein spent the last decades of his life trying to work out a theory that would explain all known phenomena. He failed, but his vision has been pursued by generations of researchers, and there have been many popular science books and articles that imply that such a theory could be right around the corner. In this talk, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explains the current status in this timeless quest and give the audience a sense of the prospects for completing Einstein’s dream.

From Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, July 15, 2020: An eyewitness excerpt from Fermilab founding director Robert Wilson is one many offered in this new retelling of the Trinity test, woven entirely from words that more than a dozen of the project’s protagonists first published in the Bulletin.

Hadrons count among their number the familiar protons and neutrons that make up our atoms, but they are much more than that.