CMS

The Big Bang Science Fair brings science communication and outreach to an arts festival in Rhode Island. The event is filled with presentations, workshops and hands-on activities covering a wide range of scientific disciplines. It makes its second appearance later this month.

The Large Hadron Collider is the world’s largest particle accelerator, known mostly for its discovery of the Higgs boson. The LHC will run for another two decades and will collect an enormous amount of data. In this 11-minute video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explains how Fermilab is heavily involved in the upgrades required to make both the accelerator and the CMS detector a physics discovery powerhouse for the foreseeable future.

Working on hardware doesn’t come easily to all physicists, but Francesca Ricci-Tam has learned that what matters most is a willingness to put in the practice.

The Fermilab LHC Physics Center and Northwestern University recently hosted about 40 participants – experimentalists at the LHC experiments and theorists — for a two-day workshop titled “Multibosons at the Energy Frontier.” Discussions focused on strategies to best exploit the LHC data in the study of multiboson events.

For years, U.S. institutions have been working to upgrade the hardware in the behemoth CMS particle detector at the Large Hadron Collider, enabling it to profit fully from the LHC’s increasing collision energy and intensity. With CD-4 approval, the Department of Energy formally recognized that the USCMS collaboration, managed by Fermilab, met every stated goal of the upgrade program — on time and under budget.

A new machine learning technology tested by Fermilab scientists and collaborators can spot specific particle signatures among an ocean of LHC data in the blink of an eye, much faster than standard methods. Sophisticated and swift, its performance gives a glimpse into the game-changing role machine learning will play in making future discoveries in particle physics as data sets get bigger and more complex.

Fermilab runs several vibrant programs aimed at educating students of all ages in all of our myriad technical endeavors, be they scientific, engineering or computational. All departments participate in these programs, but the CMS Department was especially luckily this summer. We were able to attract over a dozen exceptional young interns who participated in a broad swath of CMS activities, spanning analysis, detector upgrades and computer infrastructure.