CMS

At Fermilab we mentor postdocs to become full-fledged scientists, supporting both the scientific development and the career advancement of postdocs so they can lead our field into the future. The postdoc mentoring program in the CMS Department has served as a model for similar programs throughout the lab. It relies on three basic elements to guide the postdoc to success: a balanced and ambitious research plan, a personal team of supporting scientists, and regularly scheduled mentoring events.

LPC Distinguished Researcher Freya Blekman talks at the CMS Data Analysis School in front of a photo of her at the CMS detector at CERN on Jan. 13. people, CMS, CERN Photo: Marguerite Tonjes

LPC Distinguished Researcher Freya Blekman talks at the CMS Data Analysis School in front of a photo of her at the CMS detector at CERN on Jan. 13.

What if you want to capture an image of a process so fast that it looks blurry if the shutter is open for even a billionth of a second? This is the type of challenge scientists on experiments like CMS and ATLAS face as they study particle collisions at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. An extremely fast new detector inside the CMS detector will allow physicists to get a sharper image of particle collisions.

For Reham Aly from Egypt, now a graduate student on CMS at the University of Bari, Italy, this was the first visit to the United States and Fermilab. She had been invited to come to work at the Fermilab LHC Physics Center for two months. Another student, Angela Taliercio, an Italian working on her Ph.D. at the University of Louvain, Belgium, had visited the LPC in 2018. The rewarding experience she had, she says, made her want to come back. Reham and Angela spent staggered two-month periods at Fermilab, from October to December 2019.

Those who study particle physics will find that every step of the journey offers a new perspective and new set of responsibilities. Symmetry chats with scientists working at the Large Hadron Collider to hear about differences between seven different rungs on the academic career ladder.

The USCMS collaboration has received approval from the Department of Energy to move forward with final planning for upgrades to the giant CMS particle detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The upgrades will enable it to take clearer, more precise images of particle events emerging from the upcoming High-Luminosity LHC, whose collision rate will get a 10-fold boost compared to the collider’s design value when it comes online in 2027.

Humberto Gonzalez (on right) of the PPD Detector Development and Operations Departments at SiDet helps visitor Caleb Fangmeier, a graduate research assistant from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, hook up the vacuum that will be used for the pick-n-place step in the assembly of this gantry. The gantry will be used for assembling CMS timing layer modules. people, CMS Photo: Leticia Shaddix

Humberto Gonzalez (on right) of the PPD Detector Development and Operations Departments at SiDet helps visitor Caleb Fangmeier, a graduate research assistant from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, hook up the vacuum that will be used for the pick-n-place step in the assembly of this gantry. The gantry will be used for assembling CMS timing layer modules.

From CERN, Oct. 15, 2019: A new result by the CMS Collaboration narrows down the mass of the Higgs boson to a precision of 0.1%. After reporting the observation of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC in 2012, scientists the ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been busy understanding exactly its place within the standard model of particle physics. Any straying from expectations could be an indication of new physics.