Higgs boson

Only a fraction of collision events that look like they produce a Higgs boson actually produce a Higgs boson. Luckily, it doesn’t matter.

From CERN, Oct. 15, 2019: A new result by the CMS Collaboration narrows down the mass of the Higgs boson to a precision of 0.1%. After reporting the observation of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC in 2012, scientists the ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been busy understanding exactly its place within the standard model of particle physics. Any straying from expectations could be an indication of new physics.

From CERN, May 24, 2019: The CMS collaboration used a large proton–proton collision dataset, collected during the Large Hadron Collider’s second run, to search for instances in which the Higgs boson might transform, or “decay”, into a photon and a massless dark photon.

From Science, Sept. 13, 2018: At a recent workshop at Fermilab, more than 100 physicists gathered to hone the conceptual tools needed for the long search for collisions that produce not just one Higgs boson, but two. Fermilab scientists Marcela Carena and Caterina Vernieri, as well as others on CMS and ATLAS, comment on the plan.