accelerator technology

Operating at 325 MHz, the single-spoke resonators, or SSRs, are key to the PIP-II cold linac's performance. The PIP-II SSR technical team declared 3.25 to be Spoke Day. Fermilab engineers Donato Passarelli and Leonardo Ristori pose with one here. people, PIP-II, accelerator technology, cavity Photo: Reidar Hahn, Fermilab

Operating at 325 MHz, the single-spoke resonators, or SSRs, are key to the PIP-II cold linac’s performance. The PIP-II SSR technical team declared 3.25 to be Spoke Day.

Protecting particle accelerators and developing technology for addressing environmental issues, Arden Warner loves solving problems. He’s also chair of the Fermilab Summer Internships in Science and Technology committee, where he champions mentoring young scientists and working towards a more inclusive culture in science.

The U.S. Department of Energy has given the U.S. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider Accelerator Upgrade Project approval to move full-speed-ahead in building and delivering components for the HL-LHC, specifically, cutting-edge magnets and accelerator cavities that will enable more rapid-fire collisions at the collider. The collider upgrades will allow physicists to study particles such as the Higgs boson in greater detail and reveal rare new physics phenomena. The U.S. collaborators on the project may now move into production mode.

In December a new tool — the blue structures seen here — co-developed by CERN and Fermilab to assemble the new triplet magnets for the HL-LHC was installed and then tested with a dummy magnet at CERN. Fermilab will do the same by the end of January. CERN's Vittorio Parma seems to be pleased with the setup. accelerator, CERN, HL-LHC, accelerator technology, magnet Photo: Mike Struik, CERN

In December a new tool — the blue structures seen here — co-developed by CERN and Fermilab to assemble the new triplet magnets for the HL-LHC was installed and then tested with a dummy magnet at CERN. Fermilab will do the same by the end of January. CERN’s Vittorio Parma seems to be pleased with the setup.

From CERN Courier, Jan. 13, 2021: The US LHC Accelerator Upgrade Project, led by Fermilab scientist Giorgio Apollinari, is now entering the production phase in the construction of magnets for the upcoming High-Luminosity LHC, an upgrade of the current Large Hadron Collider. U.S. labs are building magnets that will focus beams near the ATLAS and CMS particle detectors.