accelerator technology

Don Lincoln highlights how a recent development described in the journal Nature involving miniature particle accelerator technology could advance cancer treatment. Although the technology is a long way from being perfected, it could take the form of a pocket-sized accelerator that could irradiate tumors more precisely without damaging health tissue.

From the Cornell Chronicle, September 20, 2021: A collaboration of researchers led by Cornell has been awarded $22.5 million by the NSF to continue research needed to transform the brightness of electron beams. Fermilab scientists Sergei Nagaitsev and Sam Posen are part of the collaboration team working with Cornell to improve the performance and reduce the cost of accelerator technologies that would improve beams for tumor treatment, imaging individual atoms, instruments for wafer metrology, and the Large Hadron Collider.

Protecting particle accelerators and developing technology for addressing environmental issues, Arden Warner loves solving problems. He’s also chair of the Fermilab Summer Internships in Science and Technology committee, where he champions mentoring young scientists and working towards a more inclusive culture in science.

The U.S. Department of Energy has given the U.S. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider Accelerator Upgrade Project approval to move full-speed-ahead in building and delivering components for the HL-LHC, specifically, cutting-edge magnets and accelerator cavities that will enable more rapid-fire collisions at the collider. The collider upgrades will allow physicists to study particles such as the Higgs boson in greater detail and reveal rare new physics phenomena. The U.S. collaborators on the project may now move into production mode.