sterile neutrino

From Le Scienze (France), November 4, 2021: The preliminary analysis of three years of data from the MicroBooNE experiment show no signs of the existence of a fourth type of neutrino. The standard model of particle physics remains confirmed but it has not excluded clues to exotic physical phenomena may emerge.

From Scientific American, November 4, 2021: Physicists have wondered if neutrino particles come in a mysterious fourth variety. Now new experimental findings complicate the question. Physicists have wondered if neutrino particles come in a mysterious fourth variety. Now new experimental findings complicate the question.

From Quanta, October 28, 2021: In 1993, Los Alamos National Laboratory saw hints of a fourth kind of neutrino which led to MiniBooNE. Now the results of MicroBooNE reveal sterile neutrinos alone cannot account for the MiniBooNE anomaly and the results are consistent with the possibility that only half of MiniBooNE’s events are due to neutrino oscillations.

From the BBC, October 27, 2021: Yesterday, the MIcroBooNE collaboration opened a new chapter in physics with the announcement of their results; the search failed to find the particle, known as the sterile neutrino.

This episode features an edition of Particle/Counter Particle. In this science debate show, two physicists discuss the possible existence of “sterile neutrinos,” a theorized fourth kind of neutrino. If sterile neutrinos exist, it would be a radical discovery, adding a new building block to the Standard Model of Particle Physics.

Cartoon of three balls in different shades of pink popping out of doors marked for the three different kinds of neutrinos: tau, muon and electron. To the right of them, three tiny scientists in white lab coats on scaffolding.

Back when it was theorized, scientists weren’t sure they would ever detect the neutrino. Now scientists, including some at Fermilab, are searching for a version of the particle that could be even more elusive.

At an angle from the second floor looking down into a rectangle of multi-colored, interconnected pipes.

The ICARUS detector, part of Fermilab’s Short-Baseline Neutrino Program, will officially start its hunt for elusive sterile neutrinos this fall. The international collaboration led by Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia successfully brought the detector online and is now collecting test data and making final improvements.