neutrino

A still with "Neutrino Flavors" written across the top. The o in flavors is a neutrino. Underneath it, the other two neutrino flavors illustrated, and a circle with a photo of a woman with dark hair and a pink and black top. Under her, it says "With guest Valerie Higgins." A woman with long brown hair holds an ice cream cone on the right side of the still.

Grab your bibs — in today’s tasty episode, we’re digging into neutrino flavors. Join Fermilab scientist Kirsty Duffy and archivist Valerie Higgins to meet the three flavors of neutrinos and learn how to catch a neutrino with a DONUT.

At an angle from the second floor looking down into a rectangle of multi-colored, interconnected pipes.

The ICARUS detector, part of Fermilab’s Short-Baseline Neutrino Program, will officially start its hunt for elusive sterile neutrinos this fall. The international collaboration led by Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia successfully brought the detector online and is now collecting test data and making final improvements.

Three factoid cards, which look similar to playing cards or a baseball card, appear on a background of stars in a night sky (or in outer space) in a cartoon rendering. On each of the cards is a circle adjusted its sunglasses, presumably each a type of neutrino. Underneath these images on the cards are scribbles representing text and a question mark. In the upper left corner, the abbreviations for electron neutrino, a muon neutrino or a tau neutrino appear.

Figuring out which type of neutrino is heaviest, or solving the puzzle of neutrino mass hierarchy, would be a huge leap in our understanding of both neutrinos and the physics that govern our universe. The NoVA experiment or DUNE could help physicists do just that.