galaxy

From UChicago News, Oct. 15, 2019: Astronomers at the University of Chicago, MIT and elsewhere have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation. Fermilab and University of Chicago scientist Brad Benson is a co-author of the study.

How do scientists know what percentages of the universe are made up of dark matter and dark energy? Cosmologist Risa Wechsler of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology explains. Watch the 3-minute video.

Nikolay Kuropatkin, Marty Murphy, Brian Nord and Brian Yanny created this photo of a galaxy, currently on display as part of the “Art of Darkness” exhibit in the Fermilab Art Gallery. A reception takes place on March 18 from 5-7 p.m.

Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey, using one of the world’s most powerful digital cameras, have discovered eight more faint celestial objects hovering near our Milky Way galaxy. Signs indicate that they, like the objects found by the same team earlier this year, are likely dwarf satellite galaxies, the smallest and closest known form of galaxies.

Scientists on two continents have independently discovered a set of celestial objects that seem to belong to the rare category of dwarf satellite galaxies orbiting the Milky Way. A team of researchers with the Dark Energy Survey, headquartered at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and an independent group from the University of Cambridge jointly announced their findings today.