universe

From Big Think, Feb. 6, 2023: For the first time, the proton’s size and structure was measured using Fermilab’s MINERVA detector by studying proton/neutrino interactions. This new method which studies weak force interactions, is a first step in which scientists can use to better understand the laws of the Universe.

From National Geographic (Poland), Feb. 2, 2023: A group of 150 scientists, including researchers from Fermilab and the University of Chicago, has published one of the most precise measurements of the distribution of matter in the Universe. The analysis is groundbreaking because it used data from two very different telescope surveys and it indicated that something is missing in the current standard model of the universe.

From Big Think, Jan. 31, 2023: Fermilab researchers are part of a group who studied analysis from the South Pole Telescope and the Dark Energy Survey in a series of three scientific papers describing the expansion history of the Universe is tells a confusing tale. The predictions and measurements disagree slightly, it could be a hint that our theories about the Universe need to be revised.

From Big Think, Jan. 6, 2023: While astronomers debate the existence of dark matter, Don Lincoln breaks down a new paper published in Nature Astronomy that claims to debunk a key observation that strengthens the case that the Universe is full of unseen matter.

From the Big Think, Nov. 30, 2022: Don Lincoln discusses that while the Universe we see is made solely of matter, there is no explanation for this fundamental asymmetry.
Understanding why the Universe was created with more matter than antimatter is key to understanding why anything exists.

From the Big Think, November 14, 2022: Gaia BH1 is the closest black hole to Earth that scientists have ever discovered at just 1,600 light years away. Fermilab’s Don Lincoln examines that by looking at the behavior of a star near the black hole, how astronomers might be able to determine the black hole was there, despite never seeing it directly.

From CNET, November 13, 2022: View new photos of radiant galaxies released by NASA using the Dark Energy Camera, developed and tested by Fermilab, and the Hubble Space Telescope. These new images show galaxies scattered across the universe some 200 million light-years away.