dark energy

From Science Times, January 31, 2022: The Hubble Space Telescope captured a stunning image of the Phoenix constellation with a group of galaxies collectively known as NGC that is approximately 450 million light-years away from Earth. The picture of three galaxies interacting was taken using a combination of the Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys that includes the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam), developed and tested at Fermilab.

From Brazil Culture, November 3, 2021: Fermilab’s Marcelle Soares Santos was included in this impressive exhibit of “Women in Science” curated by the Catavento Museum of São Paulo. The exhibition was conceived to bring to light women who acted and act in a significant way for scientific research and development, presenting, in monumental panels, 12 scientists from different times, nationalities and areas of knowledge. To read in English, click on the title above, right click and hit translate.

From Phys.org, August 24, 2021: Using the powerful 570-megapixel Dark Energy Camera (DECam) created and tested by Fermilab for the DES, astronomers have discovered an asteroid with the shortest orbital period of any known asteroid in the Solar System.

From Kathimerini (Greece), June 14, 2021: A multinational team of 400 researchers from 25 research centers in seven countries announced the results of the DES study that looked at 226 million galaxies and thousands of supernova explosions. The DES measurements, like those of other similar galactic surveys, informed us that the current universe is less dense than our model predicts.

From The Florida News Times, May 28, 2021: A highly accurate analysis of the DES data from the first three years of the study, show hints from previous DES data and other important experiments in the universe today are a few percent less than expected. The Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam) used in the survey was specially designed for the Dark Energy Survey, and was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and built and tested at DOE’s Fermilab.

A starry night sky with purple diagonal stripe from lower left to upper right corner above an observatory lit up in bright red. A shadow of a building or facility is in the lower right corner.

The Dark Energy Survey collaboration has created the largest ever maps of the distribution and shapes of galaxies, tracing both ordinary and dark matter in the universe out to a distance of over 7 billion light years. The analysis, which includes the first three years of data from the survey, is consistent with predictions from the current best model of the universe, the standard cosmological model. Nevertheless, there remain hints from DES and other experiments that matter in the current universe is a few percent less clumpy than predicted.