DECam

From Jumbo News, March 31, 2021: Fermilab’s Josh Frieman, Tom Diehl, Antonella Palmese, and Rich Kron as part of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration, have completed scanning a quarter of the southern skies for six years and cataloguing hundreds of millions of distant galaxies.

From NOIRLab, Feb. 8, 2021: The Dark Energy Camera, originally used to complete the Dark Energy Survey, has taken the most detailed photo of Messier 83, also known as the Southern Pinwheel galaxy. (In DECam’s second act, scientists can apply for time to use it to collect data that is then made publicly available.) In all, 163 DECam exposures went into creating this image.

From Super Interessante, Jan. 31, 2021: A team of researchers from Fermilab and the National Observatory in Brazil used the light of solitary stars to calculate the mass of some of the largest structures in the cosmos — galaxy clusters. In addition to taking the most detailed measurement ever published of intracluster light, the team’s new method of measurement can help further investigate dark matter.

When LIGO and Virgo detected the echoes that likely came from a collision between a black hole and a neutron star, dozens of physicists began a hunt for the signal’s electromagnetic counterpart.

From Listverse, May 3, 2019: The Dark Energy Camera made this list of 10 brilliant feats of scientific technology, along with LIGO, the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Large Hadron Collider.

Members of the Dark Energy Survey have partnered with the LIGO experiment in the hunt for gravitational waves. They’re the DES-GW group. DES-GW will use the Dark Energy Camera to help LIGO search for the source of the gravitational waves it detects.

Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey have released the first in a series of dark matter maps of the cosmos. These maps, created with one of the world’s most powerful digital cameras, are the largest contiguous maps created at this level of detail and will improve our understanding of dark matter’s role in the formation of galaxies.

Pictured above are many types of galaxies captured by the Dark Energy Camera. At least five are easy to spot: the edge-on spiral on the right side, the pair of colliding spirals at the bottom center, a big spiral in the top-left and an elliptical on the far left.