DECam

From CNET, November 13, 2022: View new photos of radiant galaxies released by NASA using the Dark Energy Camera, developed and tested by Fermilab, and the Hubble Space Telescope. These new images show galaxies scattered across the universe some 200 million light-years away.

From Science Times, January 31, 2022: The Hubble Space Telescope captured a stunning image of the Phoenix constellation with a group of galaxies collectively known as NGC that is approximately 450 million light-years away from Earth. The picture of three galaxies interacting was taken using a combination of the Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys that includes the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam), developed and tested at Fermilab.

From National Geographic, September 28, 2021: Recently, Fermilab ran over 200 computers to analyze Dark Energy Survey images that helped identify a new comet called the Bernardinelli-Bernstein. It is estimated the nucleus of the comet is about 93 miles wide, the biggest size estimate for a comet in decades.

From Jumbo News, March 31, 2021: Fermilab’s Josh Frieman, Tom Diehl, Antonella Palmese, and Rich Kron as part of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration, have completed scanning a quarter of the southern skies for six years and cataloguing hundreds of millions of distant galaxies.

From NOIRLab, Feb. 8, 2021: The Dark Energy Camera, originally used to complete the Dark Energy Survey, has taken the most detailed photo of Messier 83, also known as the Southern Pinwheel galaxy. (In DECam’s second act, scientists can apply for time to use it to collect data that is then made publicly available.) In all, 163 DECam exposures went into creating this image.

From Super Interessante, Jan. 31, 2021: A team of researchers from Fermilab and the National Observatory in Brazil used the light of solitary stars to calculate the mass of some of the largest structures in the cosmos — galaxy clusters. In addition to taking the most detailed measurement ever published of intracluster light, the team’s new method of measurement can help further investigate dark matter.

When LIGO and Virgo detected the echoes that likely came from a collision between a black hole and a neutron star, dozens of physicists began a hunt for the signal’s electromagnetic counterpart.

From Listverse, May 3, 2019: The Dark Energy Camera made this list of 10 brilliant feats of scientific technology, along with LIGO, the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Large Hadron Collider.