particle physics

From Live Science, Dec. 29, 2022: This past year proved successful for particle physics research. Read more about the eight projects identified by Live Science as the biggest and best physics stories of 2022 and how Fermilab was a part of two of them.

From the American Institute of Physics, Dec. 5, 2022: What is next for the P5 process and the final report from the Snowmass conference? Later this week, the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel will hear from Fermilab physicist Joel Butler who said the report is likely to be finalized within weeks.

From the DOE Office of Science, October 26, 2022: Congratulations to Fermilab’s Dr. Marcela Carena on being named Distinguished Scientist Fellow by the Department of Energy for her leadership and influential contributions to particle physics. Read more about this honor as well as who the other recipient is this year.

From the Big Think, October 7, 2022: High-energy particles can collide with others, producing showers of new particles that can be seen in a detector. By reconstructing the energy, momentum, and other properties of each one, we can determine what initially collided and what was produced in this event

From the New York Times, October 4, 2022 (Sign-up needed to view): Yesterday, the three winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics were recognized for their experiments in an area that has broad implications for secure information transfer and quantum computing. Read more about how their results have cleared the way for “new technology based upon quantum information.”

From University of Chicago News, October 3, 2022: An international group of physicists is meeting to lay out a vision for the next decades of particle physics. Fermilab’s Marcela Carena, who is a member of the committee, will participate in this study, which will help guide federal agencies, policymakers and academics as they make decisions about research, funding and planning. The study is expected to be released in 2024.

From Physics Today: Snowmass 2022 this past July took place over 10 days with almost 1,200 people participating online and in person at the University of Washington. It involved 511 white papers spanning 10 “frontier” areas. This once-a-decade meeting also reaffirmed support for completing the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) and the affiliated Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility to carry our DUNE’s science goals.

From the American Physics Society, September 14, 2022: This April, Merminga became the new director of Fermilab and the first woman to hold the position. As director, she oversees nearly 2,000 people working on cutting-edge experiments. In this interview with APS News, she discusses her life, career, and views on the future of particle physics.

From Scientific American, September 8, 2022: What came out of Snowmass 2022? In late July, nearly 800 particle physicists met for over 10 days for the once-a-decade Snowmass process to discuss and build a unified scientific vision for the future of particle physics. Find out what Fermilab director Lia Merminga presented and more about discussions around DUNE, diversity, SUSY, the LHC, future colliders and more.

From Prospect, August 29, 2022: The LHC is back running now colliding more intense beams, generating more collisions and collecting more data to sift. Fermilab’s Muon g-2 results offered an intriguing hint about muons that the LHC can follow up on by looking for new particles directly and the behavior it should induce in particles we know about.