MicroBooNE

Cartoon of three balls in different shades of pink popping out of doors marked for the three different kinds of neutrinos: tau, muon and electron. To the right of them, three tiny scientists in white lab coats on scaffolding.

Back when it was theorized, scientists weren’t sure they would ever detect the neutrino. Now scientists, including some at Fermilab, are searching for a version of the particle that could be even more elusive.

From Queen Mary University of London, April 26, 2021: Fermilab scientist Dr. Kirsty Duffy was awarded the Ernest Rutherford Fellowship from the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) to establish a new research group working on MicroBooNE at Queen Mary University of London. Duffy will continue to host the Even Bananas video series which explores neutrinos until the end of the year.

Dr. Kirsty Duffy talks about how we can see the invisible with detectors. She shares the bizarre story of the first neutrino detector: Project Poltergeist. Plus, MicroBooNE scientist Katrina Miller shows us the materials used to build modern detectors — and what scientists see when a neutrino finally says hello.

From Yale University, Jan. 22, 2021: For his new piece of music, “MicroBooNE,” David Ibbett, Fermilab’s first composer-in-residence, collaborated with physics professor Bonnie Fleming through a series of discussions about the science behind the experiment that inspired the composition. The neutrino-inspired piece premiered on Dec. 8, 2020, as part of the Fermilab Arts and Lectures Series.