technology transfer

For the first time, a team at Fermilab has cooled and operated a superconducting radio-frequency cavity — a crucial component of superconducting particle accelerators — using cryogenic refrigerators, breaking the tradition of cooling cavities by immersing them in a bath of liquid helium. The demonstration is a major breakthrough in the effort to develop lean, compact accelerators for medicine, the environment and industry.

Engineers at Fermilab have shown that sometimes, to reshape the metal heart of a particle accelerator, what you need is a balloon. The new, patented technique is a novel solution to a problem that affects an essential component of accelerators: superconducting cavities.

Have you been looking for a way to spruce up your office with some fetching Fermilab art? We may have what you’re looking for. The DOE Office of Technology Transitions has just published a new series of posters that capture success stories from all 17 Department of Energy national laboratories. The Fermilab poster features the lab’s role in advancing the superconducting wire industry. The original art, nostalgic in flavor, features the Tevatron and Wilson Hall.

Aaron Sauers is a bridge between Fermilab and industry. In this 5-minute video, he talks about what means to be Fermilab’s patent and licensing executive. Sauers with the lab’s inventors to find ways that their innovations can help tackle problems and improve our everyday lives. By exploring areas of common interest between the lab and private companies, universities and other labs, he identifies R&D that benefits everyone. For Sauers, finding new uses for lab-developed technologies is the fun puzzle he gets to solve.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Transfer Office Head Michael Paulus shakes Aaron Sauers's hand. Photo: Cherri Schmidt

Members of the national laboratories, leaders from the Department of Energy and experts in advanced manufacturing converged at the third summit in DOE’s InnovationXLab Series. Fermilab had strong representation at the meeting, featuring particle physics technologies that have been adapted for use in our everyday lives. We connected to find ways to wield national laboratory resources to help launch new industries and rejuvenate manufacturing.

When the expectation is on you to find the funding for your proposal or when your focus is on invention commercialization, how do you articulate your value proposition? To communicate the value of your work, you must understand what the customer is looking for. The Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer will host a six-week short course for Fermilab researchers interested in connecting their work with direct societal impact. Students will be exposed to core entrepreneurship and commercialization concepts and…