Mu2e

The Magnet Systems Group is back to work in HAB, building the Mu2e transport solenoid magnets. We performed what we believe is the first "critical lift" under the new FESHM 10200 Lift Plans chapter on Wednesday, June 3. This is test unit TSUN08 in its warm testing position. Mu2e, operations, magnet, technology Photo: Jeff Brandt

The Magnet Systems Group is back to work in HAB, building the Mu2e transport solenoid magnets. We performed what we believe is the first “critical lift” under the new FESHM 10200 Lift Plans chapter on Wednesday, June 3, using two cranes to rotate test unit TSUN08 from the bore-tube-horizontal warm testing position to the bore-tube-vertical cold testing position.

The discovery of the muon originally confounded physicists. Today international experiments are using the previously perplexing particle to gain a new understanding of our world.

From University of Virginia, Nov. 4, 2019: University of Virginia physicists are building major components for one of the largest and most complex physics experiments ever conducted in the United States: a $271 million particle physics project at Fermilab called the Muon-to-electron Conversion Experiment, or Mu2e.

In this 2-minute video, electrical engineer Luciano Elementi and company show us how superconducting cable is wrapped for the Mu2e experiment. Mu2e will search for a previously undiscovered process: a muon converting solely into an electron. The cables will help power the experiment when it comes online.

The building boom

These international projects, selected during the process to plan the future of U.S. particle physics, are all set to come online within the next 10 years.