CERN

Scientists in Latin America recently published the first coordinated plan for the region’s research in high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Fermilab scientist Marcela Carena was part of the group that collected input for the report. Here, she weighs in its significance.

The U.S. Department of Energy has given the U.S. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider Accelerator Upgrade Project approval to move full-speed-ahead in building and delivering components for the HL-LHC, specifically, cutting-edge magnets and accelerator cavities that will enable more rapid-fire collisions at the collider. The collider upgrades will allow physicists to study particles such as the Higgs boson in greater detail and reveal rare new physics phenomena. The U.S. collaborators on the project may now move into production mode.

Later this decade, the Large Hadron Collider will be upgraded to the High-Luminosity LHC. What does “luminosity” mean in particle physics, and why measure it instead of collisions?

From CERN, Jan. 26, 2021: This week marks the 50th anniversary of the first proton collisions in CERN’s Intersecting Storage Rings, the first hadron collider ever built. To celebrate, see hadron colliders of the last half-century — including the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider — through a historical lens, with an eye toward the quest for high luminosity and new energy frontiers.

In December a new tool — the blue structures seen here — co-developed by CERN and Fermilab to assemble the new triplet magnets for the HL-LHC was installed and then tested with a dummy magnet at CERN. Fermilab will do the same by the end of January. CERN's Vittorio Parma seems to be pleased with the setup. accelerator, CERN, HL-LHC, accelerator technology, magnet Photo: Mike Struik, CERN

In December a new tool — the blue structures seen here — co-developed by CERN and Fermilab to assemble the new triplet magnets for the HL-LHC was installed and then tested with a dummy magnet at CERN. Fermilab will do the same by the end of January. CERN’s Vittorio Parma seems to be pleased with the setup.

Matter and antimatter particles can behave differently, but where these differences show up is still a puzzle. Scientists on the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider study much more subtle differences between matter particles and their antimatter equivalents. A recent analysis allowed them to revisit an old mystery — an asymmetry between asymmetries.