matter

From National Geographic (Poland), Feb. 2, 2023: A group of 150 scientists, including researchers from Fermilab and the University of Chicago, has published one of the most precise measurements of the distribution of matter in the Universe. The analysis is groundbreaking because it used data from two very different telescope surveys and it indicated that something is missing in the current standard model of the universe.

From the Big Think, Nov. 30, 2022: Don Lincoln discusses that while the Universe we see is made solely of matter, there is no explanation for this fundamental asymmetry.
Understanding why the Universe was created with more matter than antimatter is key to understanding why anything exists.

From Science, September 29, 2022: Fermilab’s DUNE and Japan’s Hyper-K experiments are building similar yet different projects that will study neutrino oscillations and search for CP violation in hopes it will lead to answers on how the newborn universe generated more matter than antimatter. Read more on how these two projects are progressing, how they differ and how they might answer more about the elusive neutrino.

Trillions of neutrinos pass through you (and the entire Earth) every second without interacting. How do they pull off this incredible feat? Physicist Kirsty Duffy explains the origin of the neutrino’s superpower on this episode of EvenBananas.

From Forbes, April 1, 2021: Don Lincoln explains one of the biggest mysteries of modern physics is the question of why we don’t see as much antimatter in the universe as ordinary matter. Scientists working at the CERN laboratory have announced that they have used lasers to slow the motion of antimatter, resulting in unprecedented capabilities to its properties.

Public lecture by Dr. Gerald Gabrielse

Our universe is made of matter. Yet the Big Bang produced essentially equal amounts of matter and antimatter according to our most fundamental understanding of the building blocks of nature. The inability of our fundamental theory to describe this basic feature of our universe is the great frustration of modern physics. In this one-hour lecture, held on Feb. 19, 2021, Dr. Gerald Gabrielse, Northwestern University, gives an introduction to antimatter and matter, explains the theoretical framework that explains particle interactions, and gives examples of attempts to solve the mystery of antimatter.

From Forbes, Feb. 17, 2021: Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln contextualizes the accomplishment of researchers working at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, or J-PARC. They have made an atomic nucleus that contains an unstable particle called the hyperon, or cascade particle. This could help in understanding neutron stars.