CMS

The 21 CMS physicists selected as LPC Distinguished Researchers, 18 juniors and three seniors, are accomplished individuals at different stages of their careers.

The Distinguished Researchers program has been a defining feature of the LPC at Fermilab for the last eight years. The 21 CMS physicists selected as LPC Distinguished Researchers, 18 juniors and three seniors, are accomplished individuals at different stages of their careers. This program provides resources to help strengthen and expand their research programs. This year’s Distinguished Researchers were selected by the LPC Management Board in a competitive process.

The success of a scientific experiment can be measured in a few ways, but perhaps the best one is number of scientific publications. Even there, there are different ways of counting them, but a good method is the number of publications submitted per year. And in 2018, CMS had a banner year in terms of scientific output. The CMS collaboration broke a record, with 141 scientific papers submitted to peer reviewed journals. That’s nearly three each week. The previous record in high-energy physics was also held by CMS. In 2017, the CMS experiment submitted 132 papers.

The year 2018 will be remembered as a very eventful year for CMS as a whole and especially for the Fermilab group. Thanks to excellent accelerator performance, the LHC delivered much more proton-proton collision data than anticipated, making the LHC Run 2 a very successful data-taking period. Being at the very core of the detector operations and computing, the Fermilab group was key in ensuring that a large and high quality data set was collected for searches and precision measurements.

Top quark couture

The mentorship of a scientist on the CMS experiment meant everything to Evan Coleman, a former physics undergraduate at Brown University. What do you give a physicist who helped discover a fundamental particle and jump-started your science career? Something individual, artistic and science-themed.

During the last four years, LHC scientists have filled in gaps in our knowledge and tested the boundaries of the Standard Model. Since the start of Run II in March 2015, they’ve recorded an incredible amount of data —five times more than the LHC produced in Run I. The accelerator produced approximately 16 million billion proton-proton collisions — about one collision for every ant currently living on Earth.