Large Hadron Collider

What does it take to envision and build a seemingly impossible particle accelerator? The results of these discussions will shape the next 100 years of particle physics research.

These physicists comprise the LPC team that contributed to the supersymmetry analysis.

U.S. CMS physicists from Fermilab and associated universities collaborating under the umbrella of the LPC make up a team that is the first to perform a new kind of search for “stealthy” supersymmetry that does not result in an obvious signature of large energy imbalance. Instead, the LPC team is looking for collisions that result in an unusually large number of particles in the detector. CMS recently published a briefing explaining their analysis.

From Sci-News.com, March 19, 2021: Physicists from the TOTEM (TOTal cross section, Elastic scattering and diffraction dissociation Measurement) Collaboration at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the DØ Collaboration at Fermilab have found strong new evidence for the odderon, an elusive three-gluon state predicted almost five decades ago.

March 8 was the International Women’s Day, and Feb. 11 was the International Day of Women and Girls in Science. This article highlights the messages women working on the Auger Observatory have for girls.

From the CERN Courier, March 9, 2021: The discovery of an odderon, predicted to exist almost 50 years ago, was the result of a collaboration between CERN and Fermilab using data from the Large Hadron Collider as well as Fermilab’s DZero experiment. The results were presented at a CERN physics talk and are reported in a joint publication on the observations that were made in December 2020.

For researchers interested in unlocking the mysteries of the universe, having access to the most powerful high-energy accelerator on the planet, a world-class detector, and young, fresh, and enthusiastic minds are a winning combination – and the Fermilab CMS Department has all three.

dearlabby

Symmetry writer Sarah Charley answers life and relationship questions through the lens of fundamental physics. Instead of using analogies from elsewhere in life to explain science, she’ll use physics analogies to explore human nature. This time, she tackles unwanted gifts, when to give up on a dream and how friendships might be like Newtonian mechanics.