CMS

For Reham Aly from Egypt, now a graduate student on CMS at the University of Bari, Italy, this was the first visit to the United States and Fermilab. She had been invited to come to work at the Fermilab LHC Physics Center for two months. Another student, Angela Taliercio, an Italian working on her Ph.D. at the University of Louvain, Belgium, had visited the LPC in 2018. The rewarding experience she had, she says, made her want to come back. Reham and Angela spent staggered two-month periods at Fermilab, from October to December 2019.

Those who study particle physics will find that every step of the journey offers a new perspective and new set of responsibilities. Symmetry chats with scientists working at the Large Hadron Collider to hear about differences between seven different rungs on the academic career ladder.

The USCMS collaboration has received approval from the Department of Energy to move forward with final planning for upgrades to the giant CMS particle detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The upgrades will enable it to take clearer, more precise images of particle events emerging from the upcoming High-Luminosity LHC, whose collision rate will get a 10-fold boost compared to the collider’s design value when it comes online in 2027.

Humberto Gonzalez (on right) of the PPD Detector Development and Operations Departments at SiDet helps visitor Caleb Fangmeier, a graduate research assistant from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, hook up the vacuum that will be used for the pick-n-place step in the assembly of this gantry. The gantry will be used for assembling CMS timing layer modules. people, CMS Photo: Leticia Shaddix

Humberto Gonzalez (on right) of the PPD Detector Development and Operations Departments at SiDet helps visitor Caleb Fangmeier, a graduate research assistant from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, hook up the vacuum that will be used for the pick-n-place step in the assembly of this gantry. The gantry will be used for assembling CMS timing layer modules.

From CERN, Oct. 15, 2019: A new result by the CMS Collaboration narrows down the mass of the Higgs boson to a precision of 0.1%. After reporting the observation of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC in 2012, scientists the ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been busy understanding exactly its place within the standard model of particle physics. Any straying from expectations could be an indication of new physics.

From CERN, Oct. 7, 2019: The CMS collaboration has measured for the first time the variation, or “running,” of the top quark mass. The theory of quantum chromodynamics predicts this energy-scale variation for the masses of all quarks and for the strong force acting between them. Observing the running masses of quarks can therefore provide a way of testing quantum chromodynamics and the Standard Model.

The Big Bang Science Fair brings science communication and outreach to an arts festival in Rhode Island. The event is filled with presentations, workshops and hands-on activities covering a wide range of scientific disciplines. It makes its second appearance later this month.

The Large Hadron Collider is the world’s largest particle accelerator, known mostly for its discovery of the Higgs boson. The LHC will run for another two decades and will collect an enormous amount of data. In this 11-minute video, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln explains how Fermilab is heavily involved in the upgrades required to make both the accelerator and the CMS detector a physics discovery powerhouse for the foreseeable future.

Working on hardware doesn’t come easily to all physicists, but Francesca Ricci-Tam has learned that what matters most is a willingness to put in the practice.