Short-Baseline Neutrino program

From Daily Herald, July 26, 2017: The ICARUS neutrino detector — the largest liquid-argon particle detector ever built ­— ended its intercontinental journey Wednesday, rolling through the gates of its new home at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia.

After six weeks’ passage across the ocean, up rivers and on the road, the newest member of Fermilab’s family of neutrino detectors has arrived.

From The Beacon-News, July 26, 2017: Fermilab scientist Catherine James reflects on the large box sitting on a flatbed that contained half of the ICARUS liquid-argon particle detector, at 60 feet long and 120 tons the largest of its kind, which she will work with when its installed and running by the end of the year.

Sometimes, you can work on things for a long time, and it’s hard to measure progress. But there are other times when, suddenly, everything falls into place, and things happen very quickly!

A group of scientists led by Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia will transport the world’s largest liquid-argon neutrino detector across the Atlantic Ocean to its new home at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.