LHCb

Scientists at Fermilab have been world leaders — precisely measuring known physics and scouring the data, looking for hints that we may need to revise the Standard Model. Presentations of new results at a recent conference could indicate that physics discoveries are right around the corner.

From Fuentitech, October 19, 2021: Physicists have long wondered if muons, electrons, and other leptons make a difference other than mass. The latest LHCb results suggest that the answer may be “yes” by revealing two minor anomalies that continue the strange pattern of “lost” muons shown in recent data from the LHCb. In April, the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab also found a discrepancy from the Standard Model but future results may also shed light on these differences.

Matter and antimatter particles can behave differently, but where these differences show up is still a puzzle. Scientists on the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider study much more subtle differences between matter particles and their antimatter equivalents. A recent analysis allowed them to revisit an old mystery — an asymmetry between asymmetries.

This March, scientists from around the world gathered in LaThuile, Italy, for the 53rd annual Recontres de Moriond conference, one of the longest running and most prestigious conferences in particle physics. This conference is broken into two distinct weeks, with the first week usually covering electroweak physics and the second covering processes involving quantum chromodynamics. Fermilab and the LHC Physics Center were well represented at the conference.