history

A pair of 1964 films detailing the construction of Stanford Linear Accelerator Center were recently remastered and are now available for viewing on YouTube. The films provide a fascinating look back at the origins of SLAC and the history of particle physics in the United States. At the time of the production, SLAC was the largest civilian basic science project ever undertaken in the United States.

Visit the display case in the Fermilab Art Gallery to view scientific journals from the 17th and 18th centuries. Photo: Valerie Higgins

In a new series of exhibits in the Fermilab Art Gallery, the Fermilab Archives will feature influential works loaned by the private collection of a Fermilab scientist. It kicks off with the current exhibit, which features works from the 17th and 18th centuries. Each display, which will rotate approximately once a month, will consist of several volumes illustrating a common theme in the evolution of physics.

On Dec. 2, 1988, a brand-new building was added to the Fermilab campus: the Feynman Computing Center. Its dedication coincided with the 20th anniversary of the groundbreaking for the National Accelerator Laboratory, which was celebrated with a full slate of activities, including speeches, visits from consul generals, politicians and other officials, and a celebration in the atrium.

From Illinois Public Radio’s The 21st, Oct. 15, 2018: Fermilab archivist Valerie Higgins appears on Illinois Public Radio to talk about Enrico Fermi and Leon Lederman. Segment starts at 41:20

There are a few people in the history of physics who have made insights that have revolutionized our understanding of the interactions of math and physics and given us real insights into the meaning of our theories. Don Lincoln tells us of the tale of Emmy Noether – one of the most significant geniuses of the last century.

From ABC7 Chicago, June 10, 2018: Fermilab is featured on ABC show Built to Last, picked up by dozens of ABC affiliates. The 13-minute segment includes interviews with Tim Meyer, Valerie Higgins and Rhonda Merchut. Scroll to episode 5. Fermilab segment starts at 1:31.