education

On November 9, Fermilab, University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory will host an online workshop focusing on strategic opportunities to collaborate on AI research: “Partnering to Advance AI Research & Development.” This event will serve as part one of the two-part “AI + Measurements” collaboration, which aims to forge new connections in research and development. A technical workshop will follow in spring 2021. Speakers will include Cheryl Ingstad, Director of the Artificial Intelligence & Technology Office (AITO) for DOE…

During the last four months, the Lederman Science Center team has developed more than 20 virtual exhibits that communicate Fermilab science. We’re sharing these virtual exhibits with our followers on social media, so thousands of people all around the world can view the virtual LSC exhibits. Check them out.

If you are a Fermilab fan and want to compete against other fans to see who has the most Fermilab knowledge, your time has come. The Fermilab Office of Education and Public Outreach will host the first-ever Fermilab-themed Jeopardy!™ contest on Saturday, July 18.

Physics courses have a reputation among university students: If you don’t do well, then you probably weren’t meant to study science after all. Studies have shown that those who face the worst consequences from this mentality are those who are already less likely to be found in many STEM fields: women, underrepresented minorities and students from low-income backgrounds. The SEISMIC project aims to make introductory STEM courses successful for everyone.

Fermilab’s popular outreach program for high school students, started in 1980, takes full advantage of modern technology to reach a broader audience. Recordings now are available online.

Quantum computing will affect the future of every area of science, creating the need for a quantum-fluent workforce. In collaboration with two high school teachers, a group of Fermilab theorists has developed a quantum computing course for high school students. With this course, Fermilab scientists are breaking new ground in both quantum computing research and supporting the competitiveness of the STEM workforce in the quantum era.

From DOE, May 20, 2020: Lee C. Teng is now 93 years old. The internship that bears his name was created jointly by Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Particle Accelerator School in 2007. He started work at Fermilab in 1967 and spent the next 22 years working in high-energy physics. After a two-year leave of absence that started in 1983, he picked up again at Fermilab, working until 2004, when he retired.

Fermilab takes its popular STEM Career Expo to the web. This year the annual event, an opportunity for high school students to hear from more than two dozen STEM professionals about their careers, is offered as five recorded panel discussions now available on the Fermilab website. Students can learn how neutrino physicists, bioinformatics scientists, actuaries and others got to where they are and hear from people who work jobs in fields that students might pursue in the coming years.