education

From The Beacon-News, April 18, 2019: The 12th annual STEM Career Expo at Fermilab allowed high school students interested in careers in math and science to interact with scientists at the lab and other professionals. More than 30 local companies and research organizations were represented at the event.

From the Kane County Chronicle, April 11, 2019: High school students who are potentially interested in a career in the STEM fields are invited to learn more about opportunities at the Fermilab STEM Career Expo from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. April 17 at in the atrium of Fermilab’s Wilson Hall. Students will meet with STEM professionals and ask questions about STEM careers. In addition to Fermilab scientists and engineers, the STEM Career Expo will feature more than 100 professionals from more than 30 local companies and research organizations who will explain what they do.

From Daily Herald, April 8, 2019: On Wednesday, April 17, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., Fermilab will offer high school students a valuable opportunity to ask those questions in person. The annual STEM Career Expo, held in the atrium of Wilson Hall, will put those students face to face with people actually doing the jobs they will be applying for in the coming years.

Last year, rising high school senior Ketandu Chiedu from Walter Payton College Prep spent her six-week TARGET internship in the Fermilab Office of Communication. Working with her supervisor, Lauren Biron, she interviewed scientists working on the Fermilab-hosted Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment as part of the Faces of DUNE series. Mentor and mentee met up recently to discuss the internship program and what the future holds.

Students come into science from a variety of backgrounds, facing a variety of circumstances. The Fisk-Vanderbilt Master’s-to-Ph.D. Bridge Program, a partnership between Fisk and Vanderbilt universities in Nashville, is meant to take that into account. It helps students overcome external hurdles to reach their potential in Ph.D.-level STEM research. Meet three scientists connected by the program.

University of Cincinnati students are given a tour of SiDet. The bubble chamber is always a "must have picture by it" opportunity. It's massive, it's cool, and who wouldn't want their picture by this giant, science lawn ornament? Bob Shaw of the Education and Public Outreach Office, at left, brought these students. Stephanie Timpone of the Particle Physics Division led the tour. people, detector, outreach, education Photo: Leticia Shaddix

University of Cincinnati students are given a tour of SiDet. The bubble chamber is always a “must have picture by it” opportunity. It’s massive, it’s cool, and who wouldn’t want their picture by this giant, science lawn ornament? Bob Shaw of the Education and Public Outreach Office, at left, brought these students. Stephanie Timpone of the Particle Physics Division led the tour.

Respondents to Symmetry’s survey about what it’s like to earn a Ph.D. in particle physics or astrophysics offer their views of the experience. Nearly 2,000 people worldwide complete the scientific rite of passage each year. Yet for many people, the process remains mysterious.
The more than 300 responses to Symmetry’s survey described a challenging, multifaceted experience that goes far beyond job training, and even beyond the scientific goal of studying the fundamental nature of the universe.

Fermilab's annual Wonders of Science show will feature eye-popping chemistry and physics demonstrations for the whole family to enjoy. Photo: Reidar Hahn

If you know kids between the ages of 7 and 12, you know how hard it can be to get them excited about science from a textbook. Children love to be wowed and to experience physical phenomena with eyes wide and jaws dropped. That’s the thinking behind Fermilab’s annual Wonders of Science show, which will take place on Sunday, March 10, at 1 p.m. The show, organized and performed by award-winning high school teachers, is celebrating its 32nd year at Fermilab. Tickets are $5.00 per person.