black hole

Happy #BlackHoleWeek! This week, the astronomy community is celebrating celestial objects with gravity so intense, not even light can escape them. The Wilson Hall conference room is aspirational in this respect.

This is the first image ever taken of a black hole. This black hole resides at the center of Messier 87, a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster.

NOvA far detector

The NOvA experiment, best known for its measurements of neutrino oscillations using particle beams from Fermilab accelerators, has been turning its attention to measurements of cosmic phenomena. In a series of results, NOvA reports on neutrinos from supernovae, gravitational-wave events from black hole mergers, muons from cosmic rays, and its search for the elusive monopole.

Black holes live up to their name. They emit no light and they’re usually very far away. This makes it hard to take pictures of them, and indeed, some people claimed that they might not exist. But that’s no longer true. In episode 19 of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln tells us how we are quite sure that black holes are real.

Black holes are one of the most perplexing phenomena in the cosmos. There are many misconceptions in the popular press about their properties. In episode 15 of Subatomic Stories, Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln begins a several-episode miniseries talking about this fascinating phenomenon.

In recent years, scientists have found ways to study black holes, listening to the gravitational waves they unleash when they collide and even creating an image of one by combining information from radio telescopes around the world. But our knowledge of black holes remains limited. So scientists are figuring out how to make do with substitutes — analogs to black holes that may hold answers to mysteries about gravity and quantum mechanics.