Muon g-2

A still of a man with gray hair and glasses in a tshirt and black blazer. Behind him, blurred instrumentation that is mainly blue and white. To the right of him, a yellow measuring tape measuring an orange circle. In the top right corner, text: "What's g-2 all about?"

The Muon g-2 experiment announced one of the most tantalizing physics measurements in over a decade. The measurement might tell us that our theoretical calculation is missing some new physical phenomena. Or, a new theoretical prediction points to the possibility that measurement and prediction basically agree. In this exciting video, Fermilab’s Don Lincoln shares an insider’s perspective.

From Pour la Science, May 19, 2021: Is the Standard Model of Particle Physics at fault? The comparison of the first results of the Muon g – 2 experiment on the measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and the most recent theoretical results does not yet allow a conclusion.

From Wired, May 18, 2021: So imagine the excitement on April 7, when more than 200 physicists from seven countries convened on a Zoom call for a kind of nonexplosive gender-reveal party. What was to be disclosed was not a baby’s sex but the fate of particle physics.

From Bloomberg, May 8: Michael Bloomberg, founder and owner of Bloomberg News, writes an opinion piece about increased funding for the national labs using the Fermilab Muon g-2 result as an example of the federal government’s investment in the lab’s and the long-term results of research and collaborative experiments.

From the CERN Courier, May 3, 2021: Fermilab’s Muon g-2 result announcement strengthened the longstanding tension between the measured and predicted values of the muon’s anomalous magnetic moment.

From U.S. News and World Report, April 24, 2021: A team of University of Kentucky professors were part of a large-scale physics experiment at Fermilab showing results that point to a potential gap in the Standard Model of physics.