Muon g-2

From How Stuff Works, July 1, 2021: Fermilab’s Muon g-2 result announcement in April 2021 introduced the world to the muon. Although the particle was first discovered in the late 1930’s, the muon made international headlines confirming previous findings that the muon behaves in a way that contradicts the Standard Model of Particle Physics.

From the Dallas Morning News, June 13, 2021: The results of the April 7 Muon g-2 result strongly disagreed with the standard model and it is incumbent upon us now to explain this observation, writes Stephen Sekula, chair of physics and an associate professor of experimental particle physics at Southern Methodist University.

From Physics Today, June 1, 2021: How do you transport a 15 000-kilogram magnetic ring with the same width as a basketball court from central Long Island to suburban Chicago? In 2011 Fermilab shut down its particle collider, the Tevatron, which made space to host a project like Muon g – 2, to house the high-intensity proton source that would generate the muons.

A cartoon of a hand dropping a mic. "Physics Slam" is written in stylized orange to the right of the illustration. Fermilab logo runs across the bottom.

In the 2021 Fermilab Physics Slam, each contender had 10 minutes to present their topic in the most interesting way possible. This annual favorite was presented in a new, virtual format, with a Zoom audience choosing the Physics Slam Champion.

From Physics Today, June 1, 2021: How the Muon g-2 results from Brookhaven and Fermilab have challenged the standard model. Fermilab’s Chris Polly talks about the Brookhaven experiment, moving the magnetic ring and what the Fermilab results mean to the standard model and particle physics.