quantum chromodynamics

From Exascale Computing Project, May 28, 2019: Fermilab scientist Andreas Kronfeld is featured in this piece on the Excascale Computing Project, quantum chromodynamics and lattice QCD. Kronfeld, the principal investigator of ECP’s LatticeQCD project, explains how exascale computing will be essential to extending the work of precision calculations in particle physics to nuclear physics. The calculations are central for interpreting all experiments in particle physics and nuclear physics.

Physicists give the name “prompt photons” to those that are produced by two particles smashing together — hard collisions — as contrasted with those resulting from the decay of other particles. The Tevatron produced prompt photons by the hard collisions between protons and antiprotons.

Eight is enough

CMS goes looking for particle physics events that produce eight particles produced by new physics.

QCD is holding its own. Even at energies 63 percent higher compared to the LHC’s first run, the data produced during the current, second run bears out the decades-old predictions of QCD.

What are the big ideas of quantum chromodynamics? What does quark “color” refer to? How does the strong force act like a rubber band? Don Lincoln explains.

Physicists and computer scientists at the Department of Energy’s Fermilab can stake a larger claim on the future of high-energy physics-and on the next generation of computing-thanks to their part in the first-ever awards in DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC), announced today (August 14) in Washington, D.C. by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham.