Recent Releases


The 50-foot-wide superconducting electromagnet at the center of the experiment saw its first beam of muon particles from Fermilab’s accelerators, kicking off a three-year effort to measure just what happens to those particles when placed in a stunningly precise magnetic field. The answer could rewrite scientists’ picture of the universe and how it works.

Baby bison season is here, and all are welcome to visit with and photograph the newborns. Fermilab is expecting the new babies to be joined by at least 10 more over the next six weeks.

Fermilab’s Family Open House is a chance for the whole family to spend an afternoon learning about science in a hands-on way and have fun doing it. This year’s event will mark Fermilab’s 50th anniversary with a new show and several activities for kids and their parents to enjoy.

LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ), a next-generation dark matter detector that will be at least 100 times more sensitive than its predecessor, has cleared another approval milestone and is on schedule to begin its deep-underground hunt for theoretical particles, known as weakly interacting massive particles, in 2020.

NOvA scientists have seen evidence that one of the three neutrino mass states might not include equal parts of muon and tau flavor, as previously thought. Scientists refer to this as “nonmaximal mixing,” and NOvA’s result is the first hint that this may be the case for the third mass state.