argon

A woman with a black shirt looks concerned and holds a banana in one hand. To the right of her, an illustration of a sun-like object that says "The Solar Neutrino Problem" in the middle of it. An illustration of three bananas is in the right-hand corner. Different flavors of neutrinos appear to come out of the sun-like object. Two electron neutrinos are in dark brown, other neutrinos are light in shade.

Throw on your shades: Today on #EvenBananas, we’re looking at particles from the sun — and how trillions of them went missing. Join Fermilab scientist Kirsty Duffy to explore how an experiment using 100,000 gallons of dry cleaning fluid a mile underground led to one of the biggest mysteries in particle physics: the solar neutrino problem.

From the California News Times, June 9, 2021: There is a new robotics project at Fermilab called Argonaut and its mission is to sail into a sea of liquid argon kept at minus 193 degrees Celsius to monitor the condition inside the ultra-low temperature particle detector.

From Laboratory Equipment, May 31, 2021: Fermilab engineer Bill Pellico wondered if it would be possible to make the interior cameras movable using liquid argon detectors to inspect the inside of detectors.

The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment is advancing technology commonly used in dark matter experiments—and scaling it up to record-breaking sizes.