Argonne National Laboratory

In a July 23 press conference at the University of Chicago, the U.S. Department of Energy unveiled a report that lays out a blueprint strategy for the development of a national quantum internet. In February, DOE national laboratories, universities and industry met in New York City to develop the strategy, laying out the essential research to be accomplished, describing the engineering and design barriers and setting near-term goals. DOE’s 17 national laboratories will serve as the backbone of the coming…

From Inside HPC, July 23, 2020: The Department of Energy unveiled on July 23 a strategy for the development of a national quantum internet intended to bring “the United States to the forefront of the global quantum race and usher in a new era of communications.” Earlier this year, Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago entangled photons across a 52-mile “quantum loop” in the Chicago suburbs, “successfully establishing one of the longest land-based quantum networks in the nation,” according to DOE. That network will be connected to Fermilab, establishing a three-node, 80-mile test bed.

From The Wall Street Journal, July 23, 2020: The network, which uses quantum principles to more securely transmit data, could be functional in about a decade. Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago established in February a quantum network of 52 miles’ worth of entangled photons running on unused telecom fiber in the Chicago suburbs. In about a year, the network is expected to be connected to Fermilab, creating an 80-mile quantum internet test bed.

One of the most difficult problems to overcome in developing a quantum computer is finding a way to maintain the lifespan of information held in quantum bits, called qubits. Researchers at Fermilab and Argonne National Laboratory are working to determine whether devices used in particle accelerators can help solve the problem. The team will run simulations on high-performance computers that will enable them to predict the lifespan of information held within these qubits using smaller versions of these devices, taking us one step closer to the age of quantum computing.

The first major superconducting section of the PIP-II accelerator has come to Fermilab: the first of 23 cryomodules for the future accelerator. The cryomodules’ job is to get the lab’s powerful proton beam up and moving, sending it to higher and higher energies, approaching the speed of light. This first cryomodule also represents a successful joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory and Fermilab to design and produce a critical accelerator component for the future heart of Fermilab.

A Fermilab group has found a way to simulate, using a quantum computer, a class of particles that had resisted typical computing methods. Their novel approach opens doors to an area previously closed off to quantum simulation in areas beyond particle physics, thanks to cross-disciplinary inspiration.