Department of Energy

From DOE, Dec. 9, 2019: Fermilab scientist Josh Frieman writes about the search for the nature of dark energy at the national laboratories and how the Office of Science’s High Energy Physics program has been at the vanguard of a number of cosmic surveys.

From UChicago News, Oct. 18, 2019: The Department of Energy has honored University of Chicago scientists Josh Frieman, also of Fermilab, and Ian Foster, also of Argonne National Laboratory, for their transformative research and scientific leadership, selecting them as part of its inaugural Office of Science Distinguished Scientist Fellowship program. Frieman was listed for “pioneering advances in the science of dark energy and cosmic acceleration, including leading the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey, co-founding the Dark Energy Survey and service as its director.”

In their ongoing search for the mysterious dark matter that makes up 85% of our universe, the particle physics community turns its sights to particles of low mass. The Department of Energy announced that it is providing funding for two Fermilab initiatives to develop experimental designs for experiments that will be highly sensitive to the smallest particles of dark matter. Following the development of the experimental designs, the next phase of funding will be subject to additional reviews and approval.

Fermilab scientist Josh Frieman is one of five scientists who will receive the inaugural Office of Science Distinguished Scientist Fellowship. The Department of Energy is recognizing these fellows with an award ceremony, which runs from 8:30-11 a.m. today, Oct. 16. It will be streamed live. The Distinguished Scientist Fellowship was established to develop, sustain and promote excellence in Office of Science research through collaborations between institutions of higher education and national laboratories. Frieman will use the funding to support his…

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced $75 million in funding for 66 university research awards on a range of topics in high-energy physics to advance knowledge of how the universe works at its most fundamental level. The projects involve scientists at 51 U.S. institutions of higher learning across the nation and include both experimental and theoretical research into such topics as the Higgs boson, neutrinos, dark matter, dark energy and the search for new physics.

The annual DOE Project Management Achievement Awards recognize teams that have demonstrated significant results in completing projects within cost and schedule. Fermilab received two of the three given for Office of Science projects this year: one for the Muon g-2 Project and one for the Utilities Upgrade Project, both of which are key to the laboratory’s research programs.