HL-LHC

For researchers interested in unlocking the mysteries of the universe, having access to the most powerful high-energy accelerator on the planet, a world-class detector, and young, fresh, and enthusiastic minds are a winning combination – and the Fermilab CMS Department has all three.

The U.S. Department of Energy has given the U.S. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider Accelerator Upgrade Project approval to move full-speed-ahead in building and delivering components for the HL-LHC, specifically, cutting-edge magnets and accelerator cavities that will enable more rapid-fire collisions at the collider. The collider upgrades will allow physicists to study particles such as the Higgs boson in greater detail and reveal rare new physics phenomena. The U.S. collaborators on the project may now move into production mode.

Later this decade, the Large Hadron Collider will be upgraded to the High-Luminosity LHC. What does “luminosity” mean in particle physics, and why measure it instead of collisions?

The new Irradiation Test Area has met a milestone: On Jan. 11, it began transporting a high-intensity proton beam to the very first set of user experiments. The ITA will play a critical role in High-Luminosity LHC projects and others to come. The beginning of operations ushers in a new era of instrumentation development in high-energy physics.

From CERN, Jan. 26, 2021: This week marks the 50th anniversary of the first proton collisions in CERN’s Intersecting Storage Rings, the first hadron collider ever built. To celebrate, see hadron colliders of the last half-century — including the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider — through a historical lens, with an eye toward the quest for high luminosity and new energy frontiers.

In December a new tool — the blue structures seen here — co-developed by CERN and Fermilab to assemble the new triplet magnets for the HL-LHC was installed and then tested with a dummy magnet at CERN. Fermilab will do the same by the end of January. CERN's Vittorio Parma seems to be pleased with the setup. accelerator, CERN, HL-LHC, accelerator technology, magnet Photo: Mike Struik, CERN

In December a new tool — the blue structures seen here — co-developed by CERN and Fermilab to assemble the new triplet magnets for the HL-LHC was installed and then tested with a dummy magnet at CERN. Fermilab will do the same by the end of January. CERN’s Vittorio Parma seems to be pleased with the setup.

From CERN Courier, Jan. 13, 2021: The US LHC Accelerator Upgrade Project, led by Fermilab scientist Giorgio Apollinari, is now entering the production phase in the construction of magnets for the upcoming High-Luminosity LHC, an upgrade of the current Large Hadron Collider. U.S. labs are building magnets that will focus beams near the ATLAS and CMS particle detectors.