In the news

From PBS Space Time, May 25, 2022: Fermilab scientists spent almost a decade recording collisions in the Tevatron collider and another ten years analyzing data finding the W boson’s mass seems to be 0.01 percent heavier than expected. Now, understanding why the particle has mass puts the current Standard Model to the test.

From MSN (Spain), May 26, 2022: A series of precise measurements of well-known ordinary particles and processes have threatened to shake our understanding of physics from the Muon g-2 and W boson Fermilab announcements . Now the LHC is preparing to operate at a higher energy level and intensity than ever before, there is a chance that new particles are produced through even rarer processes or are hidden under backgrounds that we have not yet unearthed.

From Nature Italy May 20, 2022: CDF co-spokesperson Giorgio Chiarelli tells the story of how Italy contributed to the measurement of the W boson mass, opening a door on new physics. For more than 10 years after the Tevatron detector at Fermilab produced the last crashes between protons and antiprotons, the collaboration announced the most precise measure of the W boson mass ever achieved.

From the Nature Briefing, May 13, 2022: Based on data recorded with the CDF II detector at Fermilab between 2002 and 2011 at the Tevatron, the collaboration reconstructed more than 4 million W boson candidates through their decays into an electron or muon accompanied by the respective neutrino. The CDF Collaboration stated their result “suggests the possibility of improvements to the standard model calculation or of extensions to it”.

From USA News Hub, May 10,2022: The Dark Energy Camera on the Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter Telescope, one of the most powerful cameras in the world just photographed two distant galaxies entwined in what’s been described as a “galactic ballet.” Read more about these amazing new images captured by the DECamera developed and tested at Fermilab.

From The Conversation, May 6, 2021: A recent series of precise measurements in the LHCb, Muon g-2 and CDF experiments have threatened to shake up physics. Now, the LHC is gearing up to run at higher energy and intensity than ever before to make very precise measurements that will test the predictions of theories by looking for deviations from the Standard Model.

From NBC News, May 4, 2022: A new research initiative that includes Fermilab scientist Alan Bross plans to scan Egypt’s Great Pyramid of Giza using energetic particles from space. The new device is a high-powered telescope to map the Great Pyramid’s internal makeup from all angles and could help scientists “see” inside the ancient structure to glean new details about its mysterious inner chambers.

From Science News, April 22, 2022: A more detailed survey of the Great Pyramid is being planned by a team of researchers who will place much larger detectors than previously used outside the pyramid measuring muons from multiple angles. The results will provide a 3-D view of what’s inside in the Great Pyramid, says Fermilab particle physicist Alan Bross.