United Kingdom

From Labmate, Feb. 19, 2020: UK Research and Innovation representatives and the U.S. Department of Energy have signed an agreement outlining £65 million in contributions by UK research institutions and scientists to the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and related projects hosted by Fermilab.

From Inside Science, Feb. 5, 2020: The next generation of particle physics just got a whole lot closer. Scientists at the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment have developed a revolutionary new process that, for the first time, makes a muon particle collider within reach. Fermilab scientist Vladimir Shiltsev comments on how muon ionization cooling is a linchpin in demonstrating the technical feasibility of muon colliders.

From Science News, Feb. 5, 2020: A new experiment raises prospects for building a particle accelerator that collides particles called muons, which could lead to smashups of higher energies than any engineered before. Fermilab scientist Vladimir Shiltsev comments on how scientists with the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, or MICE, have cooled a beam of muons, a necessary part of preparing the particles for use in a collider, the team reports online Feb. 5 in Nature.

From Scientific American, Feb. 5, 2020: The best-laid plans of MICE and muons did not go awry: Physicists at the International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, or MICE, collaboration have achieved their years-long goal of quickly sapping energy from muons. The results are the first demonstration of ionization cooling, a technique which could allow researchers to control muons for future collider applications — an epochal achievement, according to Fermilab physicist Vladimir Shiltsev.

From Cambridge Network, Feb. 3, 2020: Representatives from UK Research and Innovation and the US Department of Energy have signed an agreement that outlines £65 million worth of contributions that UK research institutions and scientists will make to the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and related projects hosted by Fermilab. DUNE will study the properties of mysterious particles called neutrinos, which could help explain more about how the universe works and why matter exists at all.

From UKRI, Jan. 23, 2020: Representatives from UK Research and Innovation and the U.S. Department of Energy have signed an agreement that outlines £65 million worth of contributions that UK research institutions and scientists will make to the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and related projects hosted by Fermilab. DUNE will study the properties of mysterious particles called neutrinos, which could help explain more about how the universe works and why matter exists at all.

From STFC, Jan. 23, 2020: Representatives from UK Research and Innovation and the U.S. Department of Energy have signed an agreement that outlines £65 million worth of contributions that UK research institutions and scientists will make to the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and related projects hosted by Fermilab. DUNE will study the properties of mysterious particles called neutrinos, which could help explain more about how the universe works and why matter exists at all.

From the University of Warwick, Nov. 21, 2019: The University of Warwick has received over £900,000 to provide essential contributions to the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, which aims to answer fundamental questions about our universe. The investment from UK Research and Innovations’ Science and Technology Facilities Council is a four-year construction grant to 13 educational institutions and to STFC’s Rutherford Appleton and Daresbury laboratories.