accelerator technology

The answer is “chopper.” This is one of two chopper schemes under development for the Project X Injector Experiment, or PXIE. Particle beams are made of series of particle packets called bunches. The chopper allows scientists to prescribe specific bunch patterns for a particle beam, dictating which bunches can remain in the beam and which have to go. As a particle beam travels down the length of the chopper, each of the rectangular plates lined up along the chopper’s axis sets up an electrostatic pulse that kicks the bunch farther and farther away from the beamline, chopping it out.

Focusing beams

This is the beam-exit end of one of two NuMI horns. The horn creates a magnetic field that focuses charged particles into a beam as they pass through it (into the plane of the picture). Some of the particles from the resulting, now-focused beam then decay into neutrinos, which travel in a straight line through the earth to a distant detector for scientists to study.

This photo shows the ground electrode of the negative-hydrogen-ion source for the Project X Injector Experiment. The source, manufactured by D-Pace Inc. and licensed from TRIUMF laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, will be installed next month at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility. Once operating, it will produce ionized hydrogen atoms in its plasma chamber (not shown) and extract them through the aperture (into the plane of the picture) to form particle beams.

This survey monument, located at Fermilab’s Buffalo Farm, and several similar monuments on site form a GPS surface geodetic control network established to determine the accurate position of each monument. These coordinates are then used to establish a control network for aligning dipoles, quadrupoles and other components in the laboratory’s tunnels.

August 16, 2011 — Alex Romanenko, a materials scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, will receive $2.5 million from the Department of Energy’s Office of Science to expand his innovative research to develop superconducting accelerator components. These components could be applied in fields such as medicine, energy and discovery science. Romanenko was named a recipient of a DOE Early Career Research Program award for his research on the properties of superconducting radio frequency cavities made of niobium metal. The prestigious… More »

Officials of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, near Chicago, and of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, in Geneva, announced today (Tuesday) the shipment of an advanced superconducting magnet from Fermilab to CERN.