dark energy

The Dark Energy Camera has 74 CCDs, which allows it to take high-resolution images. Reidar Hahn took this photograph, which is on display in the Fermilab Art Gallery as part of the “Art of Darkness” exhibit.

Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey, using one of the world’s most powerful digital cameras, have discovered eight more faint celestial objects hovering near our Milky Way galaxy. Signs indicate that they, like the objects found by the same team earlier this year, are likely dwarf satellite galaxies, the smallest and closest known form of galaxies.

Pictured above are many types of galaxies captured by the Dark Energy Camera. At least five are easy to spot: the edge-on spiral on the right side, the pair of colliding spirals at the bottom center, a big spiral in the top-left and an elliptical on the far left.

The Dark Energy Survey has posted this detailed image of the Fornax galaxy cluster. The survey will measure the distributions of galaxies that are far away from Earth and compare them to the patterns of galaxies closer to Earth. Differences in these patterns give indispensable clues about how dark energy has affected spacetime over the last several billions of years.