Kurt Riesselmann

Fermilab’s beginnings can be traced to a 1963 report by a panel of U.S. scientists led by Norman Ramsey. In the 50 years since, Fermilab has grown to a laboratory of 1,800 employees, and scientists from 44 countries come to Fermilab to participate in its forefront particle physics programs.

The recent Washington, D.C., event was an opportunity to explain to Congress and their staff the cutting-edge research that takes place in the national lab system and highlight DOE’s role as a powerhouse of science, technology and engineering.

This rendering shows the location of the proposed Muon Campus at Fermilab. The arrow points to the proposed site of the planned Muon g-2 experiment. Click to enlarge. Image: Muon Department/FESS Fermilab’s plans for creating a Muon Campus with top-notch Intensity Frontier experiments have received a big boost. The Department of Energy has granted Mission Need approval to the Muon g-2 project, one of two experiments proposed for the new Muon Campus. The other proposed experiment, Mu2e, is a step… More »