Mary Magnuson

Cartoon of three balls in different shades of pink popping out of doors marked for the three different kinds of neutrinos: tau, muon and electron. To the right of them, three tiny scientists in white lab coats on scaffolding.

Back when it was theorized, scientists weren’t sure they would ever detect the neutrino. Now scientists, including some at Fermilab, are searching for a version of the particle that could be even more elusive.

Scientist and 2021 URA Early Career Award winner stands at a chalkboard working on equations.

Fermilab’s Pedro Machado has won the 2021 Universities Research Association Early Career Award for his theoretical work on neutrino science that helps experimentalists with novel search strategies and scientific questions worth exploring.

The annual Universities Research Association Thesis Award recognizes outstanding work for a thesis conducted at or in collaboration with Fermilab. Zhang’s winning Ph.D. dissertation included insights into both physics searches and equipment upgrades at the Large Hadron Collider’s CMS detector. Fermilab serves as the U.S. hub for CMS.

Two crew members stand with the drill underground.

Construction crews will excavate around 800,000 tons of rock to make space for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. But first, teams must carve out a quarter-mile-high ventilation shaft.

Photo of a dome-shaped building, likely an observatory, atop a mountain, which gold mist surrounds. Blue sky and silhouette of birds above.

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, travel bans and stay-at-home orders meant astrophysicists collaborating on the Dark Energy Survey needed to find a new way to conduct their observations using the Dark Energy Camera.

Fahim AI on-chip data processing work

The U.S. Department of Energy awarded Farah Fahim an Early Career Research Award to investigate how deploying neural networks and machine learning on a particle detector can allow data processing at source. Her work could make data processing at detectors more efficient, improving fundamental research at physics facilities like the LHC at CERN.

A man with close-cut brown hair and beard wears blue glasses and smiles at camera. In the background, blurred mountains, valley and sky.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has selected David Biedenbender as its 2021-22 guest composer. The program, now in its second year, provides a composer the opportunity to interpret Fermilab research through music and celebrate the relationship between art and science. Biedenbender has a history of creating music inspired by physics.

A man with brown chin-length hair in profile. He tucks his hair behind an ear with one hand and holds a small wire geometric sculpture in the other. He wears a dark outfit and is against a light gray wall.

Fermilab has selected California-based visual artist Mark Hirsch as its 2021-22 artist-in-residence. The program, now in its seventh year, connects physics and art. Hirsch, who uses computer models and coding for his art, will draw on his data visualization background to make Fermilab science more accessible and intriguing to the public.