Leah Hesla

Leah Hesla is a senior writer in the Fermilab Office of Communication.

Construction workers have carried out the first underground blasting for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, which will provide the space, infrastructure and particle beam for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. This prep work paves the way for removing more than 800,000 tons of rock to make space for the gigantic DUNE detector a mile underground.

An ensemble of soprano, strings, piano and electronics gives voice to the mysterious neutrino in David Ibbett’s latest musical work as Fermilab guest composer. Mapping the waves of neutrino oscillation onto melodies played by the strings, Ibbett sonifies a neutrino phenomenon typically represented in abstract mathematical expressions. Hear the performance and Ibbett’s comments in this four-minute video.

Missing March Madness? Let Fermilab fill a small part of the void created in these times of social distancing and shelter-in-place. Participate in Fermilab’s sendup of the NCAA tournament: March Magnets. Learn about eight different types of magnets used in particle physics, each with an example from a project or experiment in which Fermilab is a player. Then head over to the Fermilab Twitter feed on March 30 to participate in our March Magnets playoffs.

It was 1969, and Keith Coiley was a high-schooler who heard about a good-paying summer job working at what was then named the National Accelerator Laboratory. That year, Johnny Green, also in high school, was recruited to join the lab, as was Curtis Danner a year later. Fifty years later, they continue as productive members of the Fermilab workforce and community. In recognition of Black History Month, they talk about their experiences as black men working at an international science center over a half-century.

The USCMS collaboration has received approval from the Department of Energy to move forward with final planning for upgrades to the giant CMS particle detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The upgrades will enable it to take clearer, more precise images of particle events emerging from the upcoming High-Luminosity LHC, whose collision rate will get a 10-fold boost compared to the collider’s design value when it comes online in 2027.

After 32 years at Fermilab, the individual who has served as the lab’s extraordinary photographer — and so much more — is leaving. Reidar Hahn’s legacy will live on in his photos, the many services he’s provided for the lab, and the countless, selfless ways he has helped the lab community.